Vancouver, B.C. – (October 17) From November 19 to 26th, YMCAs across Canada celebrate Peace Week as a way of recognizing those who are working hard to build more compassionate and connected communities here and abroad. A special highlight is the presentation of the YMCA Peace Medals which are given to individuals or groups, who without any special resources, demonstrate a strong commitment to promoting peace in unique ways.

This year’s selection of nominees includes barbers who offer free haircuts and hugs to the city’s most vulnerable, best friends who provide hand-crafted meals to those living on the streets, and a therapist who travels to remote countries to raise awareness on the importance of mental health. Each and every nominee conducts their work without expecting anything in return.

This year’s YMCA Power of Peace Awards take place on November 17 at 7:00 pm at the Norman Rothstein Theatre in Vancouver. The featured guest speaker is award-winning journalist and author Michele Landsberg, best known for writing about struggles related to racial and gender equality. She’s also the author of the acclaimed book, “Writing the Revolution.”

“We’re so excited for the 2016 YMCA Power of Peace Awards,” says Yael Drinkle, General Manager, Community Operations. “It’s not very often we get a chance to honour those who are peacebuilding in such innovative ways. Peace takes many forms, and it’s these small but deeply significant acts of compassion that can transform our communities and our world. It’s such an honour to celebrate these incredible people. We can’t wait to share their stories.”

Tickets for the 2016 Power of Peace Awards are now available at www.powerofpeace.ca and cost $10 for students and $20 for general admission.

The YMCA of Greater Vancouver is a charity dedicated to the strengthening the foundations of community. We nurture the potential of children, teens and adults of all ages. We also promote healthy living and foster a sense of belonging and connection to community. The Y currently serves more than 115,000 people across the Lower Mainland.